twitterfacebookgooglepinterestgithubrssmail

The Scofflaw: One Good Thing to Come out of Prohibition

The word “scofflaw” applies to one who flouts the law.  During the dark days of Prohibition, this term was a popular one, thrown at those brave, thirsty souls forced into hidden speakeasies by their own government.

With a disapproving nod to the west, Harry’s New York Bar in Paris created the Scofflaw cocktail in 1924, giving a new, tasty meaning to the term.  Traditionally composed of rye, dry vermouth, fresh lemon juice and grenadine, some modern interpretations have substituted Canadian blended whiskey for straight rye and Chartreuse for grenadine.  I prefer to stick with the original recipe.

The Scofflaw

1 1/2 ounces rye
1 ounce dry vermouth
3/4 ounce fresh lemon juice
3/4 ounce grenadine

Shake all ingredients with ice, and strain into a cocktail glass.  Garnish with a twist of lemon.

Photo: Summit Sips

Written by Kevin Gray

1 Comment

  1. Drinking has a name « Seattle Scofflaw · April 26, 2010

    […] one, thrown at those brave, thirsty souls forced into hidden speakeasies by their own government.

Leave a Reply